Five is a Magic Number

Youthful, beautiful and talented, digital artist Quentin Jones offers a new way to look at fashion and beauty. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, Jones lends her creative touch for a special collaboration with Bally.

Valentine's Day

At 35 years old, Quentin Jones is already making a buzz-worthy name for herself in the digital art space, one that joins art and commerce at its sweet spot. And according to the Toronto-born and London based-artist, its happenstance that she is enjoying a skyrocketing career and Instagram notoriety for her intriguing video and print collages.

Artistic leanings run in Jones family, both of her parents are architects; her grandfather, a sculptor and car designer and grandmother, a sculptor and portrait painter. She grew up taking photos, painting and even making animated films as a child. She received her Masters’ degree in art in Illustration at London’s famed Central Saint Martin’s but switched from paints and pencils in her last year to photography and collages. Having done some modelling, she parlayed some fashion contacts into gigs creating videos shortly after graduation. “My first post MA project was a fashion film-combining moving artwork with videos I captured of models for a Saville Row men’s brand. My next film was for Chanel beauty” she recalled. The rest is as they say, history.

Valentine's Day

Her atypical name came from her father as she is his fifth child. The name derived from Latin was a roman name Quintis bestowed upon the fifth child. “I’ve gone through my life with people expecting me to be a man” admits Jones. While others may be surprised to discover she is far from that, the humble Jones is somewhat surprised by her current success as well. She is even more surprised yet flattered that her works have been called modern-day Dali. “It’s incredibly flattering. The surrealists were a favourite of mine growing up, so their influence has crept in. I try not to think about things in the usual way.” A comparison can also be drawn to Elsa Schiaparelli, a female surrealist who applied her art to clothing. “We are both drawn to facial features; breathing life into inanimate objects by turning them into faces. And we both work in the world of fashion and approach our projects as art pieces rather with an obviously commercial eye.” Her seminal music video “Tongue Tied” captured Miley Cyrus’ in pseudo-bondage mode is exhibit A for the non-commercial approach.

Valentine's Day

Surrealism isn’t the only love of course. Jones is currently quite smitten with her curly-towhead toddler son who makes appearances on her Instagram account. For her Bally video project, she said she wanted to create “something whimsical and playful with the images. To play with the Bally Swiss Hearts in the lighting rather than depicted, and to make sort of moving puzzles.” As a true artist draws from experience, when it comes to matters of the heart, Jones has had her share. “My first romantic love was for a boy at university. And we made each other’s lives hell and heaven in equal measures.” Kind of like mixing up images and clips in equal measure of beauty and destruction, great art goes from one extreme to the other.