All The Way Up

BALLY GOES BEYOND BASE CAMP TO clean-up EVEREST’S PEAK AT A STAGGERING
8,848 METERS HIGH, REMOVING TWO TONS OF WASTE FROM THE ICONIC HIMALAYAN MOUNTAIN

Peak Outlook Launch

On May 21, 2019, led by Dawa Steven Sherpa, Bally’s Peak Outlook team of expert climbers and guides, including Karma Tshering Lama, Jen Jen Bhote, Dafuri Sherpa, Dajangbu Sherpa and Samir Jung Thapa, reached the summit of Mount Everest, also known as Chomolungma in Tibetan, which translates to “Goddess Mother of the World.”

“Dawa and the Peak Outlook team successfully ascended as the first-ever expedition to clean-up (Everest) from Base Camp to the very top...”
Peak Outlook Launch

This climb took place during one of the most challenging seasons to date, whether enduring the hours-long queues of climbers, the shifting surface of the melting Khumbu Glacier or the temperamental weather. Despite the obstacles, including Cyclone Fani, which brought raging winds from the Indian subcontinent, Dawa and the Peak Outlook team successfully ascended as the first-ever expedition to clean-up the mountain's Peak.

With Bally’s support, the mission was able to utilise critical resources, collecting over one ton of rubbish from the “Death Zone” (over 8,000 meters), where available oxygen is a quarter of what is needed to sustain the human body at sea level. As ethnic natives to East Nepal’s high Himalayas, the experienced crew removed waste left behind including sleeping mats, winter apparel, climbing equipment, tents, empty petrol canisters, old rope and ladders, mangled by the icefall.

Peak Outlook Launch

Back at Base Camp, where Peak Outlook’s critical support team, including Naga Dorji Sherpa, Dr. Ben Clark and Dr. John Beckett managed the sorting and export of the waste to Namche or Kathmandu for subsequent processing and disposal. Later in June, as the climbing season drew to a close, an additional crew returned to Base Camp to remove discarded debris left behind by the last expedition teams that braved Everest, collecting another ton of discarded items to leave the mountain pristine in her overwhelming beauty and sacred spirit.

All photos by Samir Jung Thapa

“With Bally's support, the mission was able to utilize critical resources,
collecting over 1 ton of trash from the “Death Zone” (above 8,000 meters)...”